Bike and pedestrian safety in Boston

The video is not that fresh but presents the typical issues perceived in the USA. “Bad cyclists” and even worse drivers, the issue of wearing a helmet or not, too much motorised traffic… Consider the people who are riding; you will hardly find children or elderly people on these roads, although in my opinion this is quite normal. When cycling reminds you to a battle for survival than you need strong, young, brave and smart people to prove justification of bicycles, as a mean of transportation. So guys, keep pedaling and improvements will come soon or later!

I do have some personal experiences about cycling in a metropolis and that could be concluded like a good urban cyclist is equipped by many of the skills of the yedis. You can ride with car traffic easily if you pedal strong and only when you are fully aware of what’s going on around you. This personal ‘radar skill’ can be improved over time but if you are thinking about riding the first time than I highly recommend you to check some ‘education video’ from London (videos by Gaz545 and Veloevol).

No matter if you are riding a bike or driving a school bus! Always keep in mind that we share the road and that it is your responsibility to avoid most of the hazards of traffic.
Never forget, sharing is caring !-)

Reflections From an Engineer on Advocacy for Transportation Reform

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Have you ever felt that communication between politicians, advocates, city planners and department leaders faces huge barriers just because of the very different background and aspects they have? Well, I did and since that I always try to keep in mind, that it’s always the receiver who perceives the message and we shall be aware using the proper language “encryption” to keep a nice and friendly atmosphere around us.

There was an urban and mobility design conference called Pro Walk/Pro Bike: Pro Place 2012 six weeks ago in the United States. Although I have not attended the conference, I think it could be nice for all planners, advocates and other stakeholders to read this feedback letter from Bryan D. Jones (Deputy Director of Transportation Department in City of Carlsbad, USA).

It was published by Gary Toth at the Project for Public Spaces’s blog. The letter partly refers to the venue but has a lot more between the lines.

I might suggest that we can focus on changing to a culture of Active Transportation by changing the language and conversations. We need to identify and LISTEN to what our allies’ and perceived enemies’ objectives are. We should not just be talking, but SHOWING how effective our alternatives are through implementation—even at a small scale—with consistency, which can build a lot of momentum. However this requires us to CONNECT PEOPLE. A title I might suggest for 2014–I heard this “connection” discussion in April Economides presentation about her team’s success in Long Beach with Bicycle Friendly Business Districts. She changed perceptions by changing the language and conversations with people that were against bikes. While her passion is green stuff, she understood the passion of many of the business owners was also “green” $tuff! She spoke with them about the pro$perity of welcoming bike riders into their business districts, and did a lot of listening to their concerns and objectives.

 

Get yourself a coffee and click to read the full letter from  Bryan D. Jones.